On February 19, 2014, the U.S. Commerce Department announced that it had reached an agreement with Santa Clara-based Intevac, Inc. to settle allegations that Intevac violated U.S. export regulations governing exports of technology.  Under the agreement, Intevac agreed to pay a civil penalty of $115,000.
Continue Reading Tech Company Shares Tech, Makes Self-Disclosure, Pays Penalty

By: Reid Whitten

The European Union and United States comprise 40% of global economic output and the trade relationship between them is the largest in the world. Tariffs between the two partners are already low (only 4% on average) and the long-lived peaceful commerce across the Atlantic has held on through boom and bust.  So if trade agreements aim to free up the flow of trade between regions and increase economic activity and wealth on both sides, what policy change could promise potential gains of nearly $200 billion shared between the two economies?
Continue Reading Gentlemen, Start Your Engines: The Race for Riches in U.S.–EU Trade Begins with a Mandate from the European Commission

By: Scott Maberry and Reid Whitten

Since 2011, President Barack Obama’s administration has actively pursued export control reform designed to reduce the regulatory burdens on U.S. companies and enhance U.S. national security (as reported here).  On March 7, 2013, the Administration notified Congress of the first in a series of amendments to the U.S. Munitions List.  The next day, March 8, 2013, the White House released Executive Order 13637 to update delegations of presidential authority over the administration of export and import controls.  Also on March 8, the White House issued a fact sheet on the implementation of export control reform.  These steps, though small, mark clear progress in the President’s Export Reform Initiative.
Continue Reading Streamlining the System: More Baby Steps Toward Reducing Export Compliance Burdens

By: Mark Jensen

For the last nine months, the U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has been collaborating with NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and the National Reconnaissance Office on a “Deep Dive” survey and assessment of the U.S. space industrial base supply chain network.  The survey was originally distributed to 9,150 companies and other organizations.  Through January 2013, the government had received more than 2,000 responses, which yield a great deal of data about the space industry in the United States.

Continue Reading A “Deep Dive” into Space and Export Controls

By: Reid Whitten

On June 15, the European Union put into effect some 271 changes to its dual-use export control regulations.  The changes represent an update of the entire European export regime to incorporate numerous changes made in accordance with international agreements reached in the past few years.
Continue Reading ALERT – Changes Coming to Europe’s Dual-Use Export Regulations

By: David Gallacher and Thaddeus McBride

In 2011, the world experienced historic events, particularly with regard to the Arab Spring and the violent repression that followed in nations like Libya and Syria.  2011 witnessed the expansion of a number of international sanctions programs, most particularly tied to political developments in countries such as Iran, Syria, Libya, Sudan, Cuba, and North Korea.  Following is a summary of key developments in U.S. sanctions during 2011, as well as a brief look ahead at what may happen in 2012 in countries such as Iran, Yemen, and Myanmar (Burma). 

Continue Reading International Sanctions – Updates to U.S. Sanctions Laws in 2011