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Lisa Mays is an associate in the Governmental Practice in the firm's Orange County office. She is lead associate of the firm’s Transportation Team.

Key Takeaways:

  • Outbound investment rules may require notification, but there is less risk of transactions being blocked by regulators.
  • Investments in advanced semiconductors in China may still be subject to being blocked.
  • The required notification, review, and possible restriction still represents a massive increase (from almost nothing) in regulation on outbound investments.
  • Increases in the scope and powers of the reviewers may follow in future regulations or legislation.

Continue Reading U.S. Outbound Investment Restrictions Are Becoming a Reality

In response to Russia’s ongoing aggression in Ukraine, both the United States and the European Union have imposed additional sanctions and further restricted exports to Russia and Iran. These new controls span many industries.Continue Reading Friday Development: New Sanctions and Export Controls to Address Russia’s Ongoing Aggression in Ukraine (Including the use of Iranian UAVs)

Key Takeaways

  • New outbound investment controls likely to focus on semiconductors, AI, and quantum computing.
  • Biotechnology and battery technology investments overseas may not be subject to the upcoming proposed controls.

Continue Reading New Year, New Development: Fewer Industries May be Affected by Proposed Outbound Investment Controls (Reverse CFIUS)

As we close out a wild year for international trade regulation,[1] after hearing much talk about outbound investment review mechanisms, we may see a final dramatic change before the ball drops. Since the summer, we have talked here about potential outbound investment reviews (reverse CFIUS? SUIFC?). And while there have been reports of potential action by both Congress and the Biden Administration on outbound investment, it is all the more possible to see executive action before a new Congress takes seat.Continue Reading Will We Ring in the New Year with Outbound Investment Restrictions?

Key Takeaways

  • U.S.-person personnel at Chinese chip manufacturers are in a precarious position.
  • New rules limit what activities those persons may undertake with respect to their work.
  • However, there are ways they can nevertheless contribute to their companies, maintain their citizenship status, and comply with applicable U.S. law.

Continue Reading China Semiconductor Regulations, Episode II – The Curious Case of the American in a Chinese Chip Company

On November 15, 2022, the United States Trade Representative (USTR) opened its docket (USTR-2022-0014) seeking public comments in its review of the Trump-era tariffs on Chinese imports. The tariffs were issued by then-President Donald J. Trump under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.Continue Reading China Tariffs: Opportunity to Request Modifications

The United States Trade Representative (USTR) has announced the next steps in its review of the Trump-era tariffs on Chinese imports. Today, on October 17, 2022, USTR published the official request for comments in the Federal Register. The tariffs were issued by then-President Donald J. Trump under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974.Continue Reading China Tariffs: USTR Requests Comments for Review of Section 301 Tariffs

After Mahsa Amini was killed in the custody of “Gasht-e-Ershad” or Iran’s Guidance Patrol, commonly referred to as Iran’s morality police, following an arrest for placement of her hijab, protests have erupted throughout Iran over women’s rights and Iran’s authoritarian regime more generally. Iran’s police and other security forces are retaliating severely against protestors. In response to these human rights abuses, on September 22, the U.S. Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) sanctioned Iran’s morality police and senior leaders of Iran’s security organizations for the violence against protesters.Continue Reading Technology to Iran: OFAC Lifts Certain Iran Sanctions In Response to Protests in Iran

On April 29, 2022, the UK introduced new measures to prevent the provision of internet services to or for the benefit of designated persons.[1] These measures apply to the whole territory of the UK and to conduct by UK persons where that conduct is wholly or partly outside the UK. The designated entities or individuals (“Designated Persons”) can be found on the regularly updated UK Sanctions List with the tag “Internet Sanctions List”. To date, only V-Novosti and Rossiya Segodnya are designated under those authorities.Continue Reading Introduction of internet-related Russia trade sanctions in the UK