Tag Archives: export

The Undoing Project – Why NAFTA Can’t be Undone, but Can be Re-Done

Boy, does it sound convincing when Mr. Trump states he will submit notice under section 2205 of NAFTA to let Mexico and Canada know that the U.S. will withdraw from NAFTA. The problem is, while the president-to-be is capable, we presume, of writing, signing, and sending (or possibly tweeting) such a notification, that notification would … Continue Reading

Those Three Little Words: OFAC’s Subtle Language Shift Could Create Sweeping Change on Iran Investment

Article Highlights: Non-U.S. banks can do business with Iran and continue their relationships with U.S. banks. Non-U.S. companies may use proceeds from Iran transactions more freely, including in the United States. OFAC draws a clearer line with respect to the use of Iran-related funds. After the Iran nuclear agreement, as non-U.S. companies entered into newly-permitted … Continue Reading

Espionage and Export Controls: The iPhone Hack Highlights The New World of Warfare

Last week, researchers at Citizen Lab uncovered sophisticated new spyware that allowed hackers to take complete control of anyone’s iPhone, turning the phone into a pocket-spy to intercept communications, track movements and harvest personal data. The malicious software, codenamed “Pegasus,” is believed to have been developed by the NSO Group, an Israeli company (whose majority … Continue Reading

Read the Directions Carefully Before Playing: State Department Releases Military Drone Export Guidance

The United States has a responsibility, or so the State Department tells us, to ensure the sales and exports of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are consistent with U.S. national security interests, U.S. policy, and even U.S. values. While the government would be glad to keep the export of military drones in lock-step with our policy … Continue Reading

Military Electronics Export Reform: Let the Chips Fall Where They May

Every time there is a new round of reforms under the President’s Export Control Reform initiative, we hear the same advice: Controls on certain items are eliminated or reduced (which creates new opportunities for manufacturers and exporters); but The new rules bring new complexities, so be careful. Attorneys in the export control space correspondingly inundate … Continue Reading

Drop Your Weapons: The United States Restricts Military Exports to Venezuela

The U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) has amended the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) to restrict exports to Venezuela of certain items intended for “a military end use or end user.”  These changes complement a pre-existing U.S. arms embargo against Venezuela – in place since 2006 – that was imposed because … Continue Reading

ECR Episode IX: The Export Control Reform Turns One – What are Your Plans for the Big Celebration?

The Year Mark Apparently, it is now fashionable among my peers to host elaborate parties in honor of the first birthdays of their children. I have attended a number of these fêtes, and been impressed to just what lengths the parents will go to celebrate twelve months of growth and achievement for a Guest of … Continue Reading

ECR Episode IX – Serving up the Third Round: The Next Wave of Export Control Reform Takes Effect on July 1, 2014

In the country pubs of Ireland, it has long been the practice of the barkeep to “stand the third round” for good customers, meaning to offer the third drink for free.  The practice makes sense both as customer appreciation and as an inducement for those fine customers to continue their revelries right where they are.  … Continue Reading

Starving the Bear: The United States Restricts Exports to Russia

The pressure on Russia continues to build.  As we previously reported here and here, throughout March, the United States and other Western powers implemented a series of sanctions against individuals and entities deemed to be involved in the political destabilization of Ukraine.  Those sanctions were restricted to specific parties, including high ranking Russian and Ukrainian … Continue Reading

Just the TTIP: A Review of the Transatlantic Partnership Agreement One Year After It Is Introduced to America

Next week will mark one year since President Obama introduced the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) to the nation in his State of the Union Address.  Although the TTIP received only a brief nod in the President’s speech, the TTIP initiative has moved forward at a stunning pace . . . well, a stunning … Continue Reading

ALERT – Changes Coming to Europe’s Dual-Use Export Regulations

By: Reid Whitten On June 15, the European Union put into effect some 271 changes to its dual-use export control regulations.  The changes represent an update of the entire European export regime to incorporate numerous changes made in accordance with international agreements reached in the past few years. … Continue Reading

Proposed Easing of Satellite Export Controls Could Benefit U.S. Satellite Industry

By: Curt Dombek, Brian Weimer, Dan Brooks, and Reid Whitten Since 1999, strict controls on the export of U.S. satellites and satellite components have drastically eroded U.S. manufacturers’ market share in the global satellite industry.  On April 18, 2012, the U.S. Departments of State and Defense released the “1248 Report” containing findings related to reducing some of those controls.  The 1248 Report assesses the national security risks of removing certain satellites and related components from the tightly controlled United States Munitions List (USML) and transferring them to the generally less restrictive Commerce Control List (CCL).  The report concludes that most communications satellites, lower-performing remote sensing satellites, and related components could be transferred from the USML to the CCL without harming U.S. national security.  The transfer of these items to the CCL could greatly benefit the U.S. satellite industry by significantly easing the export controls placed on its products. … Continue Reading

On The List, Off The Menu: How 5 Major ITAR Shippers Disappeared

By: Reid Whitten and Scott Maberry How did five of the most prominent freight forwarders shipping goods subject to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR), suddenly become ineligible as carriers for ITAR exporters? The answer begins with a Sherman Antitrust action by the U.S. Department of Justice and ends, for the moment, with a major gap in logistics, supply chain, and transport for companies manufacturing, trading, or exporting ITAR-controlled products. … Continue Reading
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